League of the South Hosts “Anti-Government” Rally In Wetumpka, AL

League of the South uses new "Secede" signs in Wetumpka, AL

By Hunter Wallace

It was definitely the most rapturous response from the public that I have ever seen at any of our events.

This afternoon the League of the South used Southern Nationalist and Confederate Battle Flags at a demonstration in Wetumpka, AL. We also used some new signs that condemned “Southern Cultural Genocide” and which explicitly advocated secession and traditional marriage. We usually focus on one specific issue at our events, but this rally was unusual in that it was just straight up “anti-government.”

Interestingly enough, the combination of the Confederate Battle Flag, the anti-genocide message, and the “Secede” signs, which together are far more radical than anything we have ever done, elicited the best response. We held a similar demonstration in the exact some spot last year and the response wasn’t nearly as thunderous.

About 100 people participated in the demonstration which lasted about an hour until it was cut short due to the extreme heat. I believe around 450 Free Magnolias were distributed to the public. After arguing about the use of Confederate Battle Flag for two years on Facebook, the use of both flags in Wetumpka seemed to work well. Both flags were also recently used in Harrison, AR and Stafford, VA.

There is a time and a place to use the Confederate Battle Flag. The recent assault on our heritage combined with a series of major Supreme Court decisions has definitely struck a nerve in the South. In this pivotal summer, all the evidence suggests that Southerners are rethinking their attitude toward the Confederate Battle flag, American patriotism, and secession, and that requires some rethinking on our part. A demonstration that probably would have been considered radical two summers ago now captures the angst about America’s future that is felt in so much of the South.

We’ve come a long way from Lee Greenwood and freedom fries.

About Hunter Wallace 9875 Articles
Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Occidental Dissent

12 Comments

  1. “… the anti-genocide message …” RamZPaul posted a warning made by the Jerusalem Post to Lindsey Graham:
    http://www.jpost.com/Diaspora/Dear-Lindsey-Graham-Some-jokes-only-Jews-can-make-398971
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2015/06/24/how-germanys-ban-of-the-nazi-swastika-echoes-in-the-battle-over-the-confederate-flag/
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/warren-buffett-in-negotiations-to-relinquish-11billion-stake-in-graham-holdings/2014/02/13/bf6d0a92-94f8-11e3-83b9-1f024193bb84_story.html
    The cuckservatives don’t realize that the yidberals control the jokes, the symbols and the political debate. Yidberals won’t be satisfied until all Whites are dead and their bones are distributed for voodoo curse affirmative action.

  2. Off topic (more or less): Today, Saturday, July 25, I was on a long walk through Fishtown, a Philadelphia neighborhood that began as an Eighteenth Century suburb called Kensington, became a working-class neighborhood, fell apart post-1960s, and is becoming a hipster enclave. Maybe you’ll recall that Charles Murray, in his 2012 book “Coming Apart,” used that name, Fishtown, as shorthand for a working-class neighborhood that came apart post-1960s.

    When I pointed to some old homes and asked my knowledgeable walkmate whether he thought they were standing at the time of an 1880s event he and I were discussing, he replied that he thought they were probably built before “the war.” After a moment’s confusion, I said to him, “Do you mean the Civil War?” Yes, he said.

    That is the first time in my sixty-one years that I’ve heard someone refer to the Civil War as “the war,” the way someone might refer to World War II.

  3. I never liked that Lee Greenwood song. I became a Southern Nationalist in 1981. A teacher who taught U.S. History to 1820, from the Southern perspective, and 7th grade Texas History Class, made me one. When Republic of Texas and The League of The South started in the early nineties, I thought; “It’s about time.” I’ve always thought that the Union ™ was at the root of all our problems.

  4. I have only seen positive, successful demonstrations by the League of the South – well led, well attended, well dressed.

    I attended two League of the South protests in Middle TN and was content to hold signs, wave to people and mostly keep my mouth shut.

    The exception was one pushy Lib Southern woman accusing us all of being outside agitators.

    “How many of YOU PEOPLE are from Shelbyville?!”

    I asked her if she was real comfortable about outsiders from Somalia – polygamist Bantu Muslims who practice female genital mutilation. She retreated to her car interior in horror or defeat. I thought I was doing great, but Michael C of the League of the South put his hand on my shoulder and explained that we don’t engage antis in verbal or physical altercations. And I knew he was right. So I managed to keep my mouth shut for the rest of the demos.

    God bless the League of the South.

  5. Don’t worry, Goner, I realize the disintegration of Fishtown and similar neighborhoods, in Philadelphia and other American cities, isn’t something that has merely “happened.” Even if I didn’t get into it in my previous post, I know the left has exerted racial and cultural pressure that blew those neighborhoods to pieces. At the intersection of Front Street and Columbia Avenue, just beyond Fishtown’s western border, is a street sign that encapsulates that. It marks the point where, roughly, the neighborhood abuts North Philadelphia, the ghetto that makes up Philadelphia’s central lozenge, north of downtown. The sign shows that the street’s name changes at that very intersection (which looks pretty shabby, not incidentally). In North Philadelphia, in which it lies west to east, the street is called Cecil B. Moore Avenue, after a black attorney who successfully sued to integrate a local school (Girard College) decades ago. As soon as the street hits Front, which, as I say, roughly marks the beginning of what had once been white, working-class Fishtown, it retains its original name, Columbia. Our liberal overseers, in other words, were able to impose the street’s name-change in the ghetto, but they stopped dead-short when they hit Fishtown. (If you want to see it, run a search for “Front and Columbia, Philadelphia, PA” at Google Maps; then eye the sign at that intersection’s southwest corner, on the street view.)

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