AFA Bigotry Map

bigotry-map

This is hilarious:

“The American Family Association has identified groups and organizations that openly display bigotry toward the Christian faith.

These groups are deeply intolerant towards the Christian religion. Their objectives are to silence Christians and to remove all public displays of Christian heritage and faith in America.”

Note: I’ve long thought we need a comprehensive map of our own that would listen all the anti-White, anti-Southern, anti-Christian groups in the South.

About Hunter Wallace 9521 Articles
Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Occidental Dissent

13 Comments

  1. Atheists and Humanists?

    It looks like they are missing a lot on their map. They should go ahead and add one for me on the Nashville area.

  2. If you look at the polling data, atheists are more leftwing than the Jews. There is so much overlap between Jews and atheists that sometimes it is hard to tell whether it is their ethnicity or irreligion that is driving their attitudes.

    I never realized how fruity and dogmatic atheists are until I checked out the Richard Dawkins forum a few years ago. My encounter with the “atheist community” was one of the things that began to push me in the opposite direction.

  3. And my encounters with the blind faith religious community is what finally drove me to fully embrace racialism years and years ago. I currently live around a bunch of Jesus freaks. They were aghast and maybe even a little angry when they asked what church I attended and I told them I wasn’t religious. The look on their faces was priceless. It was the exact same look when I told them I moved away from Memphis because of the black people. Maybe they gave me that look because of their black friends who visited them from time to time. Or maybe it was because of the push by their fellow churchgoers to get more black and brown people in the aisles. I just don’t know.

    You’re still operating in this little myopic world where you think leftwing actually means something outside of a racialist perspective. If it does, then you really aren’t much of a racialist. How many times have you changed your views, or your pesona, or your labels, or your affiliations and friends, or your level of support for pro-White people over the past decade? My views haven’t changed all that much. Everything is crystal clear to me, and has been for a long time now.

    Atheists who are against racialism and pro-White people can die a quick, painful death as far as I’m concerned. Christians and the other religious fanatics who put their dogmatic faith and fairly tales before their race can die a slow, painful death. Slow or quick, I guess it doesn’t matter which one it is.

    When you try and mix race with religion, you are going to get some serious blowback. Most of the serious, sane and dedicated racialists I’ve met were either not very religious or considered themselves to be atheists, pagans or something else. Just about every “Christian” I’ve been around was a complete pushover when it came to race. Just as long as you didn’t crush their beliefs about their imaginary guy in the sky, they would buckle and bend when it came to race. I’m not exaggerating at all when I say this.

    Frankly, that’s why the Third Reich’s architects went to great lengths to inoculate their movement from the idiocy and milquetoast and malleable racialism/nationalism of the religious fanatics. Whatever opinions we all might have about their methods and policies, they sure as hell didn’t have a problem getting people to show up to their rallies, did they?

  4. Hmm.

    It is 2015. I am 34 now. I stumbled across Stormfront in 2001 around the time of 9/11 and have been involved in this scene ever since.

    As for my views on race, there was never a time when I wasn’t a racialist. I grew up in a heavily black area in South Alabama. The truth about race was always obvious to me. It is still obvious to most of the people who live around here. There was never much pressure to conform to the dogmas of “anti-racism” because when you have to interact with blacks every single day it is nearly impossible to believe that every person in the world is just as intelligent and capable as any other.

    Over the course of the last 14 years, “White Nationalism” for me was the draining experience of interacting with anonymous people on the internet until 2009, and then in 2010 there was a large explosion with several people who I had met in real life, but in hindsight who I barely knew at the time. I’ve always been a racialist and “pro-White,” but after ten years flashed by I began to wonder if White Nationalism was capable of getting out of its present ditch on the internet.

    In 2010, I joined the CofCC. I joined the League of the South in 2012. For the last 5 years, I have been involved in both groups. I ran a vBulletin forum until around 2007 and I have ran this blog since 2009.

  5. As for my views on religion, I wasn’t raised in a very religious household although I was brought up as a Methodist.

    While I was in college, I began to lose my interest in Christianity. It seemed like all the Christian churches were into pushing “anti-racism” and “comprehensive immigration reform” and whatever fad was popular in the media – now it is “gay marriage” – and the soft, sweet, mushy, feminine approach of the Methodists no longer even had a residual appeal to me. I was completely alienated from Christianity at the time especially the Social Gospel and prosperity gospel varieties.

    It was around this time that I began to get into some intense debates with an individual on my vBulletin forum. This person was a Young Earth Creationist who believed that dinosaurs were on Noah’s Ark. He liked to cite articles from Ken Ham’s website, Answers in Genesis, who is the Australian who runs the creation museum in Kentucky. His aggressive approach to Christianity left such a bad taste in my mouth that I became interested in the “New Atheists.”

    Well, it wasn’t long before I discovered that the followers of the “New Atheists” like Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris were even worse than any experience with I had with Christians. I found out that the “atheist community” was largely comprised of Jews, SJWs, homosexuals, extreme individualists and other types of deviants who don’t believe in God solely because their lifestyle is irreconcilable with religion.

    That’s when I began to wonder: does atheism/agnosticism improve White people or does it make them even worse? As far as I could tell, atheism seems to lead to a secular humanist worldview, which attracts the worst elements in our society and tends to be even more aggressive than Christianity in support of anti-racism, moral degeneracy, and leftwing politics.

    It was my interest in history that changed my view of Christianity. The heavily Americanized version of Christianity, which is on display everywhere and which is so repulsive, began to look like only the palest shadow of the Christianity that I was reading about in Europe in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era. I gradually began to realize that Christianity in the United States was under the influence of Americanism, not the other way around.

    In the Civil Rights Movement, for example, Southern Baptists didn’t lead the charge for integration. It wasn’t until the 1990s that the Southern Baptists realized that “racism” had been a sin all along. Similarly, “gay marriage” isn’t evolving out of Christianity so much as the churches are conforming to the dominant secular culture in order to stay “mainstream” and relevant.

  6. If you look at the polling data, you will find that racialists in America are overwhelmingly Christians or consider themselves “religious.” OTOH, atheists/agnostics/secularists as a group are more leftwing than the Jews. To my knowledge, blacks are the only group in America that rival atheists/agnostics/secularists in their leftwing fervor.

  7. If you look at the polling data, you will find that racialists in America are overwhelmingly Christians or consider themselves “religious.”

    Does this polling data also show the fact that Christians today are overwhelmingly against race-based nations and don’t consider themselves to be racialists or racist? For the majority of them, their religion binds them to like-minded “Christian” blacks and other non-Whites more than their race binds them to other Whites who just don’t share the same religious views as they do. Like I said, the whole concept of Right/Left and Liberal/Conservative is a meaningless rallying point outside of a racialist context. If your foundation is cemented in racialism, and it is what you truly want, then this would make sense. Christians have a problem with this kind monolithic racialist perspective just as much as the atheists. So I don’t see how you can single out and blame the non-religious when it was a majority nation of the religious that just sat back and watched everything get taken away from the White majority. That’s gotta tell you something about where their loyalty lies; and it’s not race no matter how you try and spin it.

    I’m being completely honest when I say that every Christian I personally know is a complete pussy when it comes to race. You can rob them, destroy their communities and rape their daughters, but you better not mess with their religion. They’re gonna draw a line there, buddy! You mess with their delicate sensibilities when it comes to blind faith and dogmas and next thing you know they’ll be showing up at a Chick-fil-A en masse to show you how deadly serious they are.

    Call me crazy, but if racialism is what you were really looking for, then maybe you shouldn’t have put yourself in a den of atheists who weren’t racialists to begin with. Would you surround yourself with Jehovah Witnesses and expect to come away believing your racialist point of view was well received and incorporated into their community?

    My wife had to find out the hard way about trying to fit in with groupthink association that isn’t directly tied to racialism. It didn’t work out too well and she understands a little better now. I generally don’t associate with atheists who organize and band together just because they are atheists. Same thing with Christians or other religious people.

  8. Does this polling data also show the fact that Christians today are overwhelmingly against race-based nations and don’t consider themselves to be racialists or racist? For the majority of them, their religion binds them to like-minded “Christian” blacks and other non-Whites more than their race binds them to other Whites who just don’t share the same religious views as they do.

    Sure does.

    Why is that? Is that something intrinsic to Christianity itself or is there another more compelling explanation?

    I would say there is another explanation: in their perpetual bid to stay “mainstream” and “relevant,” the American churches are pandering to whatever cultural trend is vomited up by the dominant secular culture, whether it is “civil rights” or multiculturalism or illegal immigration or “gay marriage.”

    Go back a few years ago and “Will & Grace” was on television. Now suddenly, the Mormons are for “gay rights” and Presbyterians are for “gay marriage.” These trends aren’t evolving naturally out of Christianity. They are bubbling up in the elite media and the universities, eventually they triumph in popular culture due to trendsetters like celebrities hopping on the bandwagon, and finally and usually reluctantly they are embraced by the churches.

    Like I said, the whole concept of Right/Left and Liberal/Conservative is a meaningless rallying point outside of a racialist context.

    I don’t think so.

    Originally, the division between Left/Right had nothing to do with race. Liberalism was about liberty, equality, and tolerance, extreme individualism, and building proposition nations on the basis of universal natural rights theories. That’s what set the American Founders, for example, at odds with the British Crown.

    If your foundation is cemented in racialism, and it is what you truly want, then this would make sense. Christians have a problem with this kind monolithic racialist perspective just as much as the atheists.

    Not necessarily.

    For most of our history, the Southern churches had no problem accommodating racialism. Hell, the Southern Baptists got their start in a dispute over slavery! It wasn’t until the 1990s that the Southern Baptists discovered that “racism” was a sin. They were the last mainstream institution in the US to do so.

    So I don’t see how you can single out and blame the non-religious when it was a majority nation of the religious that just sat back and watched everything get taken away from the White majority. That’s gotta tell you something about where their loyalty lies; and it’s not race no matter how you try and spin it.

    Christianity isn’t the dominant culture in the United States. It is more like an embattled sub-culture. The cultural arsonists who the real trendsetters and who determine what is “mainstream” in America are overwhelmingly non-religious: they are atheists, agnostics, and secularists.

  9. I’m being completely honest when I say that every Christian I personally know is a complete pussy when it comes to race. You can rob them, destroy their communities and rape their daughters, but you better not mess with their religion. They’re gonna draw a line there, buddy! You mess with their delicate sensibilities when it comes to blind faith and dogmas and next thing you know they’ll be showing up at a Chick-fil-A en masse to show you how deadly serious they are.

    That hasn’t been my experience.

    Most of the Christians who I know are better described as vaguely racialist. They understand that racial differences exist, but they are completely absorbed in their own lives and unwilling to take a stand on the issue. They don’t take their religion nearly as seriously or as fanatically as you are suggesting they do either. There is a wide gulf between their actions and what they profess to believe.

    Call me crazy, but if racialism is what you were really looking for, then maybe you shouldn’t have put yourself in a den of atheists who weren’t racialists to begin with. Would you surround yourself with Jehovah Witnesses and expect to come away believing your racialist point of view was well received and incorporated into their community?

    My impression was that atheists were overwhelmingly Jews, homosexuals, SJWs, leftists, extreme individualists and people who hated religion because it was incompatible with their lifestyle. “Freethinkers” is about the last term that I would use to describe the atheists who I have encountered.

    “Fanatic” is a term that I would use to describe someone who is dogmatic, rigid, and inflexible about their point of view that even thought of disagreement sends them sputtering into outrage. Again, the atheists who I have met were far more likely to behave like “fanatics” or “fundamentalists” than the Christians who I know.

    My wife had to find out the hard way about trying to fit in with groupthink association that isn’t directly tied to racialism. It didn’t work out too well and she understands a little better now. I generally don’t associate with atheists who organize and band together just because they are atheists. Same thing with Christians or other religious people.

    Well, that sounds more similar to my experience with them.

  10. Correct me if I am wrong, bit am I the guy around here who was ever featured as a leading HATE Wascist leader of the month by the SPLC .

    Hunter, did you ever win this honor?

    🙂

  11. Great idea HW. A map of how many whites (defined as nationalities originating in Europe) exist in each global polity would also be interesting.

    Separately, I used to like the idea of competing for ranking on the SPLC watch list, seeing who could reach the top without encouraging anything actually violent, illegal, crazy, etc.

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