Caribbean Project: Cayman Islands vs. Haiti

The Cayman Islands vs. Haiti
The Cayman Islands vs. Haiti

Cayman Islands

Imagine a place that is 60 percent multiracial, 20 percent black, and 20 percent White, but where 1.9 percent of the population lives in poverty, where there is a 4 percent unemployment rate, where there are more businesses than people, and which has achieved the 17th highest GDP per capita in the world in spite of “the legacy of slavery,” and being only 586 miles from Haiti.

Unlike Haiti, where 72.2 percent of the population lives in poverty and 54.7 percent of the population lives in extreme poverty, and which has a 40 percent unemployment rate, imagine a place which rejected abolition, black supremacy, independence, and communism (in the case of Cuba), and instead of exterminating Whites and banning foreign investment, decided it was better off to remain colonized under the British Crown, fervently embrace foreign investment, and implement all kinds of crazy rightwing ideas like abolishing the income tax, capital gains tax, and other corporate taxes.

Hail the Cayman Islands!

Note: The wealth that is stashed away in the Cayman Islands, Bermuda, and the Bahamas isn’t being generated there by the natives, but the same is true of Florida and Texas which don’t have a state income tax and which have benefited from the fiscal decline of New York and Illinois. Like Florida, the Caymans, Bermuda, and the Bahamas have also taken full advantage of tourism.

16 Comments

  1. Haha! When I worked for a certain “too big to fail” bank which shall remain nameless, we used to chase accounts through the Cayman Islands branch whenever we had to fine tune the books before releasing the Quarterly Report. LOL

  2. Is a tourist ‘economy’ and key base of our greatest enemy, ‘The Bankers’ (aka Global Elite, etc.) really a GOOD model or example for anyone?

    Comparing the tiny Caymans — a few ‘naval base’ specks of land so low-lying they were almost entirely inundated by a recent hurricane, holding an urban population of only 40 to 50 thousand, and almost NO rural, farm population (only about two hundred Caymanians grow a few fruits and vegetables) — to Haiti that is more than one hundred times larger, with millions of peasants farming hundreds of times more arable land, may be called an ‘apples to oranges’, or ‘Bankers to bananas’.

  3. Would it be speaking out of turn for me to bring up the fact that this is where the $outhern Poverty Law ¢enter has its ill gotten funny money stashed away to keep it out of reach of a future right wing Justice Department prosecuting it for the zillions of Federal laws it has violated in conducting its “business?”

  4. The Caribbean should be about smuggling, swindling and profit.

    The dream of the European er peasant made real. Jersey, Monte Carlo and Andora recast in shark infested waters.

  5. It’s nothing more than a tax refuge for money laundering and tax evasion, but it sure beats living in a place like Haiti.

    You say that like it’s a bad thing, HW. As if the Fed doesn’t like competition in their own game, or something….

  6. “…It’s nothing more than a tax refuge for money laundering and tax evasion, but it sure beats living in a place like Haiti….”

    It’s not an “either/or” yet, but it is getting to be that way. Fancy corruption like Vegas for proles or the horror of Haiti.

    But neither is what any ethnic nationalist would call a “real society,” (where the majority speaks your language, has a similar “code” for living, shares art, food, music, and other cultural things, where you feel “at home” wherever you go, instead of alienation and foreign-ness everywhere from doing banking, to other phone business, to doing clothes shopping, getting groceries, eating in restaurants, etc…)

    Obviously, “diversity” means alienation from your own culture (at the least, at the worst, it’s a code word for genocide).

    Then everyone complains about feeling “alienated,” lol. If the stated basis for your whole culture is “diversity” or in other words, “alienation,” then obviously you would feel alienated, foreign, cut off, bad, silenced, invalidated by others of your type, etc, etc..

  7. …but it is true that the Caymans are better than Haiti. Still, I would never want to go to either. There are too many other better places, and the kind of people who hang around such islands aren’t going to wind up being my friends. Which is why it should never become an ‘either-or.’ Most people don’t want caymans/ bahamas or haiti. (I’ll take Alaska.)

  8. ‘As if the Fed doesn’t like competition in their own game, or something’

    @Fr John: Good, normal-appearing, regular-guy, ‘Mainstreaming’ WNs don’t mention or believe in ‘The Fed’ or Mossad or any other ‘conspiracy theory nonsense’, or talk or think ‘theological’. LOL

  9. A lot of people do dream of running their own island paradise.

    It’s part of the American mythos from the earliest time see The Tempest.

  10. I recently listened to a YouTube series where someone with an American accent read through the Protocols of the elders of Zion.

    The conventional understanding of the document is that a Russian Secret policeman of some sort wrote it in the 1880s. Even if this is so, and I echo Henry Ford here, it’s surprisingly prophetic. There a few clumsy references to Czarist Autocracy that strongly suggest a Russian hand, but let’s face it, these Russkis knew the Jews really well. They gave Moishe a good run for his money until 1917.

    Anyway, I’d love to have become a governor on an island like Jersey or Barbados or the Isle of Man. In the Med such islands were the basis of classical civilization. I’m particularly thinking of Rhodes and Santorini.

  11. What evil white guy, or heroic white guy doesn’t want some island to hatch plots or bed chicks? At least 6-10 European cultures were born on Islands. The genesis of the Americas are to be found on islands.

  12. “The wealth that is stashed away in the Cayman Islands, Bermuda, and the
    Bahamas isn’t being generated there by the natives, but the same is true
    of Florida and Texas”…the idea that Texas doesn’t generate wealth and relies on transfers from tourism or flight capital is silly. The oil, gas, and petrochemical industries are wealth creation.

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