About Hunter Wallace 9514 Articles
Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Occidental Dissent

20 Comments

  1. Once you understand that the “resurrection” of Christ is just a mythical story that symbolizes the return of Spring it starts to makes sense.

    • Why did you kill Christ kyke? Why did you kill an innocent man who did no wrong? Are you a human being or are you a Goddamned animal? Only an animal preys on the weak and the innocent, only animal.

      • Yeah, as in it was around well before Christianity. It’s too much to ask a Christian to do a little research, though.

    • Once you understand what it is to have The Holy Ghost inside you, and you experience it’s consistent transcendant power, you begin to feel sorry for being unable to explain it, because you would like all others to have the blessing which transcends all others.

      That said, it is no accident that The West abandoned it’s former understandings of The Cosmos in the first millenia, nor is it an accident that, after it had done so, it went from being a storied backwater, just as was any other on the globe, to being transcendent in every sense of the word – or, at least, as life goes on the Planet Earth.

      The Rise of Europe and The Salvaging and Salvation of Untold Billions of Souls, here on this earth and beyond,is not only the legacy of the rise of Christendom’s effect, but a testimony to a power that cannot be quantified or qualified by anything other than The Inner Eye.

  2. Why did they kill him? Why did they kill an innocent man who did no wrong? And why do these very same people who killed the innocent Christ think they have the moral authority to rule over us?

  3. I was raised a Southern Baptist. Then my teen years were unbridled agnosticism and hedonism. At 21, I was baptized into the Church of Christ (the one without musical instruments). I left at 28, became agnostic again. I have read Camus, Hitchens, Harris, Sartre, Dawkins, etc. they make good arguments, but at the end of the day I am unable to face death and the annihilation of my conscience self. If there is no God, no afterlife: what is the point of existence? If you will never see your family again after your mortal flesh has rotted and been consumed by worms; what is the point?

    These questions, and a desire to believe in something greater than myself led me to join and be baptized into the LDS Church (Mormons.) I had grown up with Mormons in Arizona, so I was familiar with their kindness, and commitment to family and their faith. (I was a boy scout. Every boy scout in 1960s Arizona had a Mormon den mother and scout leader.)

    But in the end, my rational mind, my critical thoughts, could not believe that a young farm boy in upstate NY (Joseph Smith) was visited by and angel, wrote the Book of Mormon, and that the LDS Church is “God’s true church.” I left the Mormons, knowing that it was all nonsense and made up theology.

    Last year I walked into a magnificent Catholic cathedral and was awe-struck by the ancient architecture and spiritual atmosphere. I nearly brought me to my knees. Almost. At the end of the day, I cannot believe in Catholic theology anymore than I can the “fire and brimstone” theology of Baptists or Church of Christ, or the Mormons for that matter, despite many of them being my friends.

    “Faith” for me, is a bridge too far. But what do the existentialists and atheists offer me? The cold assurance that my conscience, my essence, my memories, my life experience, will not not survive the death experience? So, I am agnostic, but not by “choice.” I long for something more, something deeper, but “faith” never survives my rational mind and thought process.

    I am “the reluctant atheist.” The agnostic who resists agnosticism, but cannot embrace “faith.”

    • As old Catholic priests would tell those who were doubters, atheists, scoffers and searchers including those hostile to the Faith: Act as though you had faith and faith will be given unto you.

      • Truly insightful comment, 12. Reminds me of something Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler said something along the lines of : ‘Keep acting who you think you are in your dreams, and one day you will be it.’

    • I thank you for your revelatory and very interest comment, Mr. Martin!

      As a convert to Orthodox Christianity, who has attended thousands of Protestant services and bible classes, and whose wife is a convert to Roman-Catholicism, I can say this : —— The Bible is an imperfect document – full of contradictions, likely falsehoods, blended with straight unfiltered history.

      Moreover, m any of the assumptions Christians make have no correlary in the book.

      As to the Church which has been the foundation stone of The West (The Church in Rome) it is an immensely complex phenomenon that is full of beautiful, yet tragically heinous things.

      That said, I’ll say to you what I have said to my wife many times – Human existence is, as it’s foundation, illogical, as there is absolutely no requisite for the existence of souls, or the existence of souls in physical form.

      That so, we are here for extralogical reasons. Thus, it stands to reason that that which would tend to our souls would have to defy the analytical component of our brains.

      Whether Chryst was God, was the son of God, or was merely a man into whom came something immeasurably and singularly godly, is all moot, because, in the end, something occurred in His life that has been of such moment, The West, and, indeed, the world entire, has not been the same since.

      No matter how much theology or scripture is exaggerated and or out and out false, since his crucifixion Chryst has been the principle fountain of enduring goodness in this world.

      It Chryst were merely a psychosomatic phenomenon, tens of billions of people never would have claimed it, because there never has been an instant where a placebo, of any sort, had such an affeckt.

      Something profound is there, though, again, I grant you – a lot of the accompanying theology seems a bit of a stretch.

      In any case, thank you again!

      • The crucifixion of Jesus is one of the most obscure and loosely recorded events of the first century – a century of rich historical literature . Even Christians can’t agree on which year or date the crucifixion happened. Contemporary Romans did not seem to have taken any notice of it at all. Strange for an event which Christians consider to be the most important of all time.

  4. For those who believe in it, you’ve got the wrong day.

    Pardon me for niggling on details but why not, everyone is in quarantine.

    I’ve written on this in the past and will put it here.

    Y’all have the day wrong.

    Claiming it’s a Sunday would make a liar of Jesus, since he said he’d be in the tomb 3 days and nights, and he was gone on Saturday night, and before sunrise when Mary Magdalene saw the stone was gone from the tomb entrance.

    Jesus, if one is a believer in his existence and crucifixion/resurrection, was crucified and put in the tomb on a Wednesday afternoon, not a Friday.

    The Passover meal was eaten on Tuesday and Wednesday at sundown was the beginning of the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread.

    Look at Mark 16:1 about Mary Magdalene and Salome anointing him after the Sabbath.

    Back then when a person passed they put them in a tomb rather than bury them, and the family/friends put spices in the tomb to reduce odors.

    Jesus was supposed to be put in the tomb before the high Sabbath, so they didn’t have time to buy the spices….

    Then in Luke 23 it says the women observed the tomb, returned and prepared spices and oils. Then it says they rested on the Sabbath according to the commandment.
    Mark says they bought them after, Luke says they prepared them before they rested on ‘the Sabbath’.
    The word has been changed in translations and should read ‘Sabbaths’.

    Mark is talking about the “high day” Sabbath (Feast of Unleavened Bread) that started on Wednesday at sundown and ended Thursday at sundown, that’s when the women bought the spices. Luke says they prepared the spices and then rested on the Sabbath ‘according to the commandment’ which was their normal weekly Sabbath, Friday sunset to Saturday.

    In Matthew 28:1 it is shown to be plural but was changed to singular, the translation from Alfred Marshall in the Interlinear Greek-English NT show this.

    Jesus said he’d be resurrected in three days and three nights in Matthew 12.
    John 20 says that Mary Magdalene went to the tomb early, while it was still dark, and saw the stone was taken away.
    So he wasn’t resurrected on Sunday morning at sunrise.
    He was put in the tomb on Wednesday. Three days and three nights=Saturday at sundown.

    That’s why he’d have been already out of the tomb on Sunday morning.

    So what’s interesting here, even to an unbeliever, is that Jesus’ words are consistent with the time frame he gave, the three days and three nights, and you can prove it when digging into the details.

    But if you don’t know that they aren’t referring to one Sabbath in the different Gospels it looks like he couldn’t have been there 3 days and nights.

    Details matter, same as Covid or anything else you really want truth on.

    Faith doesn’t fear inquiry, it welcomes it.

    Happy Easter/Ishtar, Resurrection Day, or just plain ‘Sun’day.

  5. This comment section really has gotten particularly distasteful. Blackpilling is one thing but the outright mockery and blasphemy is something I can’t believe is genuine amongst anyone i call friend or brother. It is blackpilling just for the sake of causing dissension, hatred and a lack of hope. Regardless Happy Easter to all of you and your families. God Bless and may all of you be in good health of body mind and spirit

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