The Mainstream: A History

I don’t care about being “mainstream.”

This is largely due to my historicism. There was no such thing as the “mainstream” in America until the 1960s. We didn’t think of ourselves as a “Nation of Immigrants” until the 1960s. We didn’t care about accusations of racism, sexism, nativism, xenophobia, homophobia, transphobia or Islamophobia. We didn’t care about accusations of “white privilege” either.

All the various -isms and -phobias which are secular sins against the “mainstream” were created and popularized by the media in the 20th century. In fact, most of them don’t go back further than 1950. They don’t have anything to do with the substance of traditional Western morality.

You’re not a “good” or “bad” person because you reject the “mainstream” which is actually nothing more than a cartel of mass media outlets which didn’t exist a century ago:

8 Comments

  1. Very good points! I was born in 1951 and saw many of these thing take place, beginning when I was rather young. “Nigger” was a commonly-used word among us kids in elementary school in rural north Alabama in the ’50s and early ’60s. Teachers would hear and just smile! No getting in trouble! Everyone in town would joke about being “jewed” by the local clothing store (((owner))). It was a rather healthy time to be alive, culturally and politically. But things were already changing, especially beneath the surface. They exploded in the 1960s, a terrible (and terribly interesting) decade in which I came of age.

  2. It’s all about the power of endlessly repeating memes. No one knew or cared what a “racist” was in 1960.

  3. It’s a shame Americans have such a short memory. Anything past 10 years ago is ancient history so as far as most people are concerned, the mainstream has always been how things are.

  4. Here in North Texas, in 1977, we got scolded for saying Nigger in school. Not because it was offensive, but because Gentleman don’t use crude language in front of Ladies. Seriously, that was our teacher’s only concern. Not the feelings of actual niggers.

  5. You’re not a “good” or “bad” person because you reject the “mainstream”
    which is actually nothing more than a cartel of mass media outlets which
    didn’t exist a century ago:

    The left in the past has criticized the “corporate media” yet that media has promoted the Civil Rites narrative since the mid-20th century. This is especially true of television. It supported the narrative against what was probably the majority of American opinion, especially in the South. More recently, the left appears to be supporting that same media since it is cheerleading the “resistance” against Trump.

    One might consider what would have happened back in the 1950s had pro-segregation forces controlled at least one of the major television networks.

    In any event, this points up the need for the Alt Right and Nationalists to create their own mass media. Revolutionaries have always understood that agitprop/PSYWAR/infowar is central to the struggle.

  6. All those made-up “isms” and “phobias” sound like they came straight out of the disordered minds of jew psychiatrists.

4 Trackbacks / Pingbacks

  1. Steve King, Conservatism and American Exceptionalism – Occidental Dissent
  2. Steve King, Conservatism and American Exceptionalism – AltRight.com
  3. Yesterday’s Radicalism Is Today’s Mainstream – Occidental Dissent
  4. Yesterday’s Radicalism Is Today’s Mainstream – AltRight.com

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