Paul Kersey on Birmingham 2012

Alabama

This is excellent stuff.

I hope Paul Kersey will write After the Cameras Left: Birmingham under Black Run America, 1965-2012 and chronicle how the Visible Black Hand of Economics brought Birmingham to its knees.

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29 Responses to Paul Kersey on Birmingham 2012

  1. John says:

    Didnt the town where King was gunned down turn into a turd pit as well?
    You can visit the sniper nest that wassieface used to pick off MLK as a museum. I understand that it is a creepy as fuck.

  2. Wayne says:

    In the deranged mind of the anti-white leftist, our civilization and the future of our children deserve to be destroyed because our ancestors held slaves and instituted Jim Crow. You cannot negotiate with these people without the use of physical force, that is all they will understand.
    As far as the church bombing, what does anyone really know about it? The MSM had a total lock on information and they hated us as they still do. Some of my colleagues will knee jerk start with Southern lynch mob stories when I bring up State’s rights, but they never consider why lynchings occurred, aside from our ancestors were racist scumbags What a crock of bullshit!

  3. John Bonaccorsi, Philadelphia says:

    Some of my colleagues will knee jerk start with Southern lynch mob stories when I bring up State’s rights, but they never consider why lynchings occurred, aside from our ancestors were racist scumbags

    Every time someone at this blog posts something like that, I wonder where he or she is hearing such things. I’ve lived in the North virtually my entire life and have never heard anyone say anything like that. I guess my life has been even more sheltered than I’ve realized.

  4. Dixiegirl says:

    OT but Dallas has one of those sniper-perch-museums for JFK, also. Weird.

  5. John Bonaccorsi, Philadelphia says:

    PS Oh, wait, I did hear a Jewish liberal professor make an anti-Southern comment in a classroom, here in Philadelphia, on Martin Luther King Day in 2000. I was shocked, especially because, for all I knew, there were Southerners in the room. On another occasion, he made a snide reference to “goyim.” A charmer, as you’ll guess.

  6. YT says:

    Does dissolving detroit involve thermo-nuclear weapons? Or does it just mean it gets absorbed into the surrounding counties?

  7. John Bonaccorsi, Philadelphia says:

    [Mr. W -- please delete my third comment--the one that begins "PPS"--above. It adds nothing. It was intended as a correction of my comment before it, but I now see that no correction was necessary.]

  8. Wayne says:

    John B.: do you bring up States rights? That’s the pushback I always get.

  9. John Bonaccorsi, Philadelphia says:

    No, I don’t bring up states’ rights, Wayne; but I think the simple fact is that I, unlike most of the other persons who post here, really have been sheltered from many of these political things. The first time I was addressed as a Yankee here (by Apuleius, when I’d said something or other that had bothered him), I was startled. “Yankee?” I thought. “Isn’t that what they used to call Northerners during the Civil War?” I never really thought about North and South, except that, well, I knew persons in the South had a Southern accent. Years ago, during that same semester in which I had that Jewish liberal professor, I had a young female instructor who was from the South–Atlanta, I think. I barely even noticed that she was in the habit of saying “y’all.” (One of my classmates mentioned it.) It would never have occurred to me to say, “Oh, she’s from the South; she must be a racist scumbag.” Similarly, I once complained to Apuleius, here, that he wasn’t listening to something or other that I was saying. He fired back something like, “You’re hitting me with all those Yankee stereotypes about us Southerners–’You don’t listen.’” I didn’t even know what he was talking about; I had no idea that was a stereotype. (I still don’t; I’m taking his word for it.) Similarly, I have no antipathy to the English, even though one of my maternal great-grandfathers was a County Mayo rebel who had to slip out of Ireland, to the U.S., to avoid being hanged by the British. It would never occur to me to say something negative about the English. I love them; I love everything about them.

    I’m not saying I’m some sort of sweetheart. I’m a vicious person. It’s simply that my viciousness doesn’t extend to these sorts of ethnic things or whatever they would be called. Accordingly, I’m invariably surprised when I encounter anger or unpleasantness about them. Because I myself don’t experience it, I’m not expecting it from others.

    At this blog, I have got into many heated exchanges, with Mr. W. and others, about the South’s cause during the Civil War, but that is simply because I think slavery was objectionable. I have never thought of the men and women of the South as anything other than my countrymen and countrywomen. I’ll repeat: that’s not because I’m a decent person; I’m not. It’s simply that my mind doesn’t move in those channels and that, consequently, I’ve probably not encountered some of the things you and other persons at this blog discuss.

    I think Stonelifter and some of the other Southerners who post here have said, on a number of occasions, that Yankees are trying to wipe out Southerners and that Southerners are always depicted negatively in, say, movies or television shows. When they say those things, I genuinely don’t know what they’re talking about; but maybe again, it’s simply that I’m not seeing it. I just think, “Well, doesn’t everybody love Dolly Parton? Didn’t everybody watch The Dukes of Hazzard?” Well, I guess I’ll close simply by saying that I’m trying to come up with ways to enable whites of all kinds to flourish, but you know as well as I do that our race is in a difficult position.

  10. John Bonaccorsi, Philadelphia says:

    Correction: County Clare.

  11. John says:

    All you need to do us point out WHY segregation was needed–Black criminality. Blacks today are a blight on civilized standards. Reel off cases of murders and rapists and molestors. Have the rates of crime ready to roll prepare for the pussified answer about history of repression and then point out that life is measurably shorter and more brutal in Africa than it ever was in Antebellum Southern states. Be prepared to shock your listener. Whining blacks and liberal apologists you Are never satisfied til you have the shirt off everyone’s backs.

  12. White & Confederate says:

    Wayne that is a good point about the church bombings. Fake anti-black ‘hate crimes’ are common today. They are probably not a recent phenomenon. They could certainly have been a black flag operation by Washington or the ‘Civil Rights’ movement.

  13. John says:

    JohnB,

    Can you really have missed the century of propaganda against Dixie?
    Sure, some movies were forgiving, but most have been viciously unfair to beleaguered white populations down south.

    Look at the shit that was shovelled on the Afrikaner.

  14. John Bonaccorsi, Philadelphia says:

    Can you really have missed the century of propaganda against Dixie?

    I guess I really have missed it, John. If it’s there, I’m just not tuned into it. Some years back, I read part of a book by Theodore Bilbo, who, as you probably know, was a Southern politician (twice governor of Mississippi and later a U.S. Senator, if Wikipedia may be credited). As I recall what I read, the book was a plea for Americans outside the South to help the South move its black population out of the South (overseas, I guess); Bilbo argued, I think, that the South’s white population would be destroyed, via miscegenation, were the move not to be carried out. As I read the book, I was troubled; I thought, “Why didn’t somebody listen? Why didn’t anyone help them (the Southern whites)?” Later, of course, in liberal writing or journalism, I encountered a negative reference or two to Bilbo; but I said to myself, “Well, that’s what I would expect from liberals.” Were you to have said to me, “Don’t you see? The entire country, outside the South, is damning the South, as a home of the racism Bilbo represents,” my reaction would have been, “The whole country? Not I. I’m a racist myself. Where are you seeing the whole country participating in an anti-Southern rhetoric-fest?” As I say, maybe I just don’t notice it.

  15. Mosin Nagant says:

    “The first time I was addressed as a Yankee here…I was startled”: Same here. It is still an unusual use of the term.

  16. Stonelifter says:

    Where is the pro-Southron actions by Yankees to offset the war, the civil rights movement or all the anti-Southron bias in text books covering the ear?

  17. Stonelifter says:

    Which is not to say that men like Mosin, Rudel or even John from pa are aginst us but the vast numbers of them…. Different story

  18. Stonelifter says:

    Damn huge fingers and iphones….

    John B, I suggest you read the South was Right to get the 1st notion of all thr anti Southron actions of the yankees over the years

  19. John says:

    Note the current film on Lincoln. Lincoln Vampire Killer. Wild Wild West. Mississippi Burning. To Kill a Mockingbird. The deification of Lincoln strikes me as mondo bizarro.

    Griffith was buried after his Birth of a Nation. Perhaps Gone With the Wind was forgiving. That’s about it.

  20. Mosin Nagant says:

    “Yankee” might have originated as a term of contempt for the Dutch “Jankes” (“Little Johns”), the pirates of the New Netherlands colony, but certainly was applied early to all New Englanders and then to all soldiers in the colonial revolutionary forces, by the British, It was applied later to all inhabitants of the northern states and all soldiers in the Union Army by the Confederates, and to all inhabitants (northern AND southern) of the United States by foreigners. It has been used as a term of contempt and as a term of respect, and as a popular self-identification, in the past. But today it is a very UNCOMMON term, in my experience. I had encountered it only rarely in my life (except as the name of the popular sports team) until discovering THIS website.

    No judgement intended, I am simply relating my experience.

  21. Mosin Nagant says:

    Correction: “Janke” should have been “Janneke” — “little John” in Dutch.

    New Englanders who invaded northern Pennsylvania in the mid-eighteenth century, taking land claimed by Pennsylvanians were called “Yankees” by the Pennsylvanians.

    I did some research on the very strange (to me) expression “Damned Yankee” that appears so often on this website. Surprisingly it predates Lincoln’s War by decades. I am surprised to learn that it is IN USE today, and NOT something unique to certain posters and commenters on this website.

    I came across an old joke that defines a “Yankee” as “someone who comes from the North for a visit and then goes back,” and a “damnyankee” (it often appears as one word) is “someone from the North who comes to the South and stays.”

  22. Mosin Nagant says:

    Another recent good one, Stonelifter, is “Lincoln Unmasked” by DiLorenzo.

  23. John says:

    I thought it was the Iroquois corruption of the French l’Anglais , “yangees”. Another possibility is that it’s from Yanker… Bullshitter.

  24. John says:

    Hoosiers and sooners have similar roots.

  25. John Bonaccorsi, Philadelphia says:

    Where is the pro-Southron actions by Yankees to offset the war, the civil rights movement or all the anti-Southron bias in text books covering the ear?

    Stonelifter, I live in Philadelphia. I have my hands full just trying not to get shot when I go to the 7-Eleven.

  26. Mosin Nagant says:

    There was another Indian language theory that was disproven, I read. Also, the Dutch derisively called English settlers “Jan Kees” (“John Cheeses”).

  27. Mosin Nagant says:

    “I live in Philadelphia. I have my hands full just trying not to get shot when I go to the 7-Eleven.”

    Kill-adelphia (a.k.a. “City of Brotherly Love”) metropolitan area, the state within the state.

  28. Rudel says:

    This little ditty by E.B. White from before WWII is a bit obsolete especially since Vermont got totally overrun by folks from New York City but:

    “To foreigners, a Yankee is an American.
    To Americans, a Yankee is a Northerner.
    To Northerners, a Yankee is an Easterner.
    To Easterners, a Yankee is a New Englander.
    To New Englanders, a Yankee is a Vermonter.
    And in Vermont, a Yankee is somebody who eats pie for breakfast.”

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